Containers…creative wrap ups

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Kiyomizu-dera Temple, Kyoto, Japan…..temple offerings
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China….Pots and pans…containing gastronomic delights

 

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Sausalito, California…..taffy temptations

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Hung Hum, Kowloon, Hong Kong….the daily catch

Good Luck Charm

Statue 1The benign expression is what floored me. The souvenir porcelain called “Shigaraki Yaki Tanuki’ good luck charm which I found in souvenir shops on way to Kiyomizu-dera temple, Kyoto.  A bearer of Eight lucky omens, the hat is for protection from unexpected disasters, the smiling face for affability, the big bold eyes for seeing the world for what it is and the big belly for being bold. No wonder I saw a larger version in a Japanese restaurant in Houston, Texas, USA.

Ailsa’s Travel theme: Statues

Noodle Trail

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Some where in Sheung wan, Hong Kong

The surprising part is that I am not a food person but gastronomic interjections have always been lurking in the background. In the 1970s while in the midst of understanding the nuances of the Romantic poets P B Shelly, Keats and William Wordsworth ( for Bachelors at Allahabad University) I would willingly miss lectures to gormandize on Sweet & Sour soup followed by Chicken noodles twirled in Chicken sweet ‘n’ sour.

Indian-Chinese food, especially the three mentioned dishes, was the ultimate in food luxury, McDonald’s and Pizza Hut were nowhere near Allahabad’s ambit, with restaurants and roadside food stalls were in business, forget the authenticity. Even our helper dreamt of returning to his native village in Bihar to open a noodle shop,even Maggie noodles would do and worked hard to invest in woks, ladles and packets of Maggi noodles. The ‘Genuine Fake’, as a salesperson on Nathan Road (Kowloon) would say, was gaining popularity.

Marriage and travels did not lessen the craving for Chinese food, in all its avatars, and my first choice in whichever part of India or world I would be in, would be noodles and Chilli Chicken or Sweet & Sour and second choice Indian Mughlai preparations. Our five-year stay (1995-2000) in Muscat, Sultanate of Oman was a diversion with Middle Eastern cuisine, especially Lebanese shawarma*, taking precedence.

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Dried fish boat, Aberdeen

In July 2008 I found my self winding down from Hong Kong International Airport to Kowloon. The lights and traffic could not wrap away the distinct aroma that trailed us on our walks in the malls, lanes and markets of the Island, Kowloon and the New Territories. My initiation into the wet markets, discovered by chance, was lamentable and urbane in turns. Initially, the raw meat smell forced me to walk away from the forked hanging pigs, the bloated ducks, the flowing tanks of unknown fish, prawns, scallops, colored crabs, clams, oysters and carts of dried sea food and chicken claws. My curiosity over rode my olfactory senses, guiding me to the markets and lanes of Sai Kung, North Point ferry station, Peng Chau and Cheng Chau islands, Tai Po, to Hung Hom lanes and Yau Ma Tai food streets and food vendors.

On occasions food masqueraded as outings on the stony trails of Ng Tung Chai waterfalls scrunched between bare rocks and tropical vegetation on the northern slopes of the cone-shaped Tai Mo Shan in Kowloon; on tram rides to the Peak and its surrounding attractions; ferried us to Discovery Bay, Lamma, Lantau, Peng Chau and Cheng Chau, Tung Lung Chau (off Clearwater Bay) and Tap Mun the Grass Island on the northern part of Sai Kung ( would be asked whether I had tried “iceless” cold milk tea, sun-dried fish and boiled squid and shrimp); on the Buddhist path to Diamond Hill and the Nunnery, the Monastery of Ten Thousand Buddhas (Man Fat Sze); the Jumbo Kingdom floating restaurant in Aberdeen; Tai Ho, where I had gone to watch the Dragon Boat Race, famous for its gourmet delicacies the Loh Mai chee glutinous handmade rice balls stuffed with sesame and peanut paste or Cha Gwoh rice dumplings stuffed with mixture of Chinese herbs; Po Lin Monastery for its popular vegetarian fare and the concrete jungles of Central, Causeway Bay, Shueng Wan, Kowloon, Wan Chai for their pubs, cafeterias, fast evolving eateries and Michelin starred restaurants.

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Wedding feast in Taizho, China

The Chin-India cuisine was replaced by Cantonese, Anhui, Fujian, Hunan, Szechuan, Jiangsu, Shandong and Zhejiang cuisine originating from different regions of China. The closest to Indian-Chinese is Szechuan, spicy and oily, though by now I was developing a taste for soup noodles and dim sums. In Beijing, Shenzhen, Guangzhou and Shanghai I stuck to McDonald’s and KFC. The one time I tried traditional Chinese cuisine was a post wedding lunch at a village near Taizho situated south of Ningbo on the eastern coast of Zhejiang province, Mainland China. We had accompanied the groom’s friends and family to bring his wife from her parental home and were treated to a lavish wedding feast prepared by village cooks in the backyard. I had never tasted or seen so much exotic fish and would ask my friend the names every time a new dish was served.

My one grouse is that I can never walk into a Chinese food place on my own as the menu is mostly in Cantonese. Somehow learning languages has never been my forte and in six-years stay could manage ‘wai’ or Hello and that too because it is the most frequently used word. The goof up happened in Shanghai where I tried all possible actions, flapping wings, quacking, doodling to get across the ‘chicken’ word to the waitress. The girl, probably in a rush, as it was nearing closing time, came with our order that looked and smelled beefy. Our doubts confirmed by a young man had to be content with side veggies. Another impossible venture is using chopsticks as my fingers seem stuck in the ‘two left feet’ syndrome no matter what the encouragement or admonishment, ‘See…it is so simple..place it between thumb and fingers and voila the grain is in your mouth’. I wish it was so easy.

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Okonomiyaki in process

In  between there were trips to USA, Canada, Japan and I preferred to try local temptations than the five-star presentations. In Hiroshima it was the ‘Japanese Pizza’ the ‘Okonomiyaki’ a thin layer of batter and a generous amount of cabbage on top of yakisoba noodles. One can opt for toppings of oysters, squid and cheese with bonito flakes, green laver and okonomiyaki sauce and optional extras, mayonnaise, pickled ginger, and seaweed. We were seated at a counter facing the chef preparing the okonomiyaki on a large griddle and could see other eaters drooling as he speed-chopped, layered, topped and presented the precursor of a snack called ‘issen yōshoku’ or “one-cent Western meal”.

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Calgary Poutine

‘Poutine’ was another luck-in was in Calgary, Canada, on a cold, snowy day. ‘Poutine’ or simply piping hot crispy fries and cheese curd cut into pieces dunked in gravy of choice, to meld in a unique flavor. Initially, I was hesitant in trying it out but then the first few bites had me scrapping till last bite.

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You cannot have enough of them…fish

Every city has its own aroma, sometimes familiar, and six years down the line the ‘Chinese Takeaway’, in words of Betty Mullard* has become more than a city to explore, it has become a way of life via the gourmet trail.

*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shawarma

* Kowloon Tong. A novel of Hong Kong by Paul Theroux

Kinkaku-ji Temple (The Golden Pavilion) Kyoto

Kinkaku-ji Temple, “The Golden Pavilion”, breathtaking in its golden glory.

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Excerpt from my article Kyoto Japan – the Iconic Lady (All Ways Traveller)   www.allwaystraveller.com/online

‘ Another luminous example of antiquity is the Golden Pavilion or Kinkauji from the period when there were no cameras to capture its golden glory reflected in the still waters of the Magic Pond or Kyoko-chi.  The tourist pictures do little justice to the real structure and a visitor can just gawk at the play of colors, burnt amber, fiery reds, vivid yellows, amidst the surrounding foliage of Kinugasa-yama Mountains in the background.  The eight different sized islands or famous rocks in the Pond personify the Buddhist scriptures ‘Land of Happiness’ and for the harried visitor a natural stress buster.  Hayashi Yoken, a recalcitrant monk, had burnt down the Pavilion in 1950 and the present Golden Pavilion is a replica of the original, with extra gold added to the two floors.

I walked around the Japanese Garden, retained in its original form, with natural springs, moss gardens, waterfalls and bridges, the Dadoniji Stones, try plunking coins in the stone bowls for luck, the Sekka-tei tea house and the Fudo Myo, a mini temple in honor of the god of fire and wisdom. The bushes around the temple, ornamented with tiny pieces of paper containing wish-fulfillment messages, are the links between past and present.’

Weekly Photo Challenge….Yellow

Cee’s Which Way Challenge

A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.”
Lao Tzu

Snapshots of journies by car, on foot and train in Japan, Hong Kong, Macau and Coldspring, New York.

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Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge -Two

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The elegant eight feet tall metal Tancho cranes merge with the ambiance of Burnaby Mountain Park, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

The red-crowned crane or Tancho in Japan, are known to dance their elegant dance of dips and jumps in pairs, and watching the green pair I expected them to spread out their wings and twirl, choreographed by the mountain breeze. The birds have a perfect setting, surrounded by roses and multicolored flowers  and greenery all around with spectacular views of sunset over Burrard Inlet, and at a distance the Indian Arm, the North Shore mountains and downtown Vancouver.

The metal eco-sculptures are filled with soil and covered with porous landscaping fabric. Plants are then inserted through the holes, made in the fabric, to hide the frame for a near perfect replica of the real cranes.

Tancho cranes carry a heavy esoteric burden as symbols of luck, longevity and fidelity. At traditional Japanese marriages 1000 paper origami cranes are included to wish 1000 years of happiness and posterity on the couple. To the Chinese and Vietnamese the crane is a carrier of spirits to heavenly shores.

1. Red-crowned CraneWikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red-crowned_Crane

2. Japan Atlas: Kushiro Marsh and Japanese Cranes (Tancho)
web-japan.org/atlas/nature/nat16.

The real Tancho Cranes. (Wikipedia photo)

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Multicolored

Travel theme: Multicolored
New York in summer (2013) is a different experience altogether as the city appears to shed its winter inhibitions.

Astoria, New York, a former Greek sanctuary…now a multi cultural, multi racial fun packed space with old world charm.

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Rock ways Beach, New York….a summer fun with loads of sun, surf and sand.
A walk along the boardwalk and plastic paddles sums up the mood of renewal after the blathering by Sandy in 2012.

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Cold spring village along the Hudson….another summer getaway of sun, blue skies and cool aqua of the Hudson River. The antique village with its paved streets, antique shops and galleries reflect the colors of nature

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